E3 2015: Street Fighter V Hands-On

by: Matt -
More On: E3 2015 Street Fighter V

Say what you will about the decision to make Street Fighter V a console exclusive, if it means that Capcom is able to provide a more stable product and at the same time make things easier for the fighting game community to unite under one console then I am all for it, especially after getting to play Street Fighter V on the show floor. My impressions can be found after the jump.

 

I only got a few sets in, but from what I saw and experienced, I'm more hyped than ever for the next iteration of the venerable fighting franchise. Nash (Charlie) was who I was most excited to get my hands on, and with new Tournament Edition sticks on hand, I saw what Guile's replacement was capable of, and had a ton of fun in the process.

The most immediate difference, Nash is no longer a charge character. All of his moves have been shifted to quarter circle motions, which makes him geared a lot more toward offense. But he still retains some of the reactionary and zoning nature of a charge character thanks to his V-Skill ability that allows him to absorb projectiles to add it to his own meter. Meanwhile his V-Trigger allows him to teleport, giving him an opportunity to counter a poorly timed fireball. His change in special moves means he no longer has a the same offensive capabilities he once had. His sonic boom projectile feels slow, and his kick specials are reminiscent of Adon's Jaguar Kick, popping him up in the air to bring down a heel on opponents. His other kick special keeps him on the ground when combined with weaker kicks, while the roundhouse kick version will take him airborne, and looks very similar to the kicks that Rugal from the King of Fighters series employs. 

Playing Street Fighter V felt like a good evolution from Street Fighter 4, the game felt smooth, the controls felt tight, and the links that people grew familiar with in Street Fighter 4 still require the same amount of finesse in Street Fighter V. The character visuals are looking great, and while it was an early build and some of the background elements looked a little low-res, it's obvious that all of these things will receive some work before the game launches in 2016. 

 

I o

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ly got a few sets in, but from what I saw and experienced, I'm more hyped than ever for the next iteration of the venerable fighting franchise. Nash (Charlie) was who I was most excited to get my hands on, and with new Tournament Edition sticks on hand, I saw what Guile's replacement was capable of, and had a ton of fun in the process.

The most immediate difference, Nash is no longer a charge character. All of his moves have been shifted to quarter circle motions, which makes him geared a lot more toward offense. But he still retains some of the reactionary and zoning nature of a charge character thanks to his V-Skill ability that allows him to absorb projectiles to add it to his own meter. Meanwhile his V-Trigger allows him to teleport, giving him an opportunity to counter a poorly timed fireball. His change in special moves means he no longer has a the same offensive capabilities he once had. His sonic boom projectile feels slow, and his kick specials are reminiscent of Adon's Jaguar Kick, popping him up in the air to bring down a heel on opponents. His other kick special keeps him on the ground when combined with weaker kicks, while the roundhouse kick version will take him airborne, and looks very similar to the kicks that Rugal from the King of Fighters series employs. 

Playing Street Fighter V felt like a good evolution from Street Fighter 4, the game felt smooth, the controls felt tight, and the links that people grew familiar with in Street Fighter 4 still require the same amount of finesse in Street Fighter V. The character visuals are looking great, and while it was an early build and some of the background elements looked a little low-res, it's obvious that all of these things will receive some work before the game launches in 2016. 

 

I only got a few sets in, but from what I saw and experienced, I'm more hyped than ever for the next iteration of the venerable fighting franchise. Nash (Charlie) was who I was most excited to get my hands on, and with new Tournament Edition sticks on hand, I saw what Guile's replacement was capable of, and had a ton of fun in the process.

The most immediate difference, Nash is no longer a charge character. All of his moves have been shifted to quarter circle motions, which makes him geared a lot more toward offense. But he still retains some of the reactionary and zoning nature of a charge character thanks to his V-Skill ability that allows him to absorb projectiles to add it to his own meter. Meanwhile his V-Trigger allows him to teleport, giving him an opportunity to counter a poorly timed fireball. His change in special moves means he no longer has a the same offensive capabilities he once had. His sonic boom projectile feels slow, and his kick specials are reminiscent of Adon's Jaguar Kick, popping him up in the air to bring down a heel on opponents. His other kick special keeps him on the ground when combined with weaker kicks, while the roundhouse kick version will take him airborne, and looks very similar to the kicks that Rugal from the King of Fighters series employs. 

Playing Street Fighter V felt like a good evolution from Street Fighter 4, the game felt smooth, the controls felt tight, and the links that people grew familiar with in Street Fighter 4 still require the same amount of finesse in Street Fighter V. The character visuals are looking great, and while it was an early build and some of the background elements looked a little low-res, it's obvious that all of these things will receive some work before the game launches in 2016. 

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