News

Slow as Sunday: A new decade for gaming

Posted by: Nathan at 1/10/2010 5:33 PM
Looking into the future of video games is a past time that is more than a hobby for some. I count myself among those who look toward the coming years with optimism and hope for the increased quality and new innovations to come in the next decade. Certainly we will see new platforms, physical or otherwise, that elevate the user experience of video games but also change the how we interact with the games we play. Motion controls have become well established as the next big tool in game developers belts but there is a new and exciting technology emerging to the forefront of home entertainment; three dimensional displays.

As I have yet to experience 3D gaming first hand I am constrained largely to speculation and the promise of future technologies that have been displayed to the public. One aspect of 3D displays cannot escape my mind; the use of 3D with motion based controls. I have some trepidation concerning the period of time in which this coupling of technology will become viable. I do feel that this revelation is close at hand. With the big three already employing or making plans to utilize motion controls with their home video game consoles, its hard not to imagine how 3D would effect this type of experience. Sony is pushing big for 3D and Nintendo has not sighted high definition as a big part of their plans for the future; maybe they're looking further into the future?

Whoever manages to bridge the individual experiences of 3D and motion controls will be the harbingers of the next revolution in gaming technology. Nintendo was on the forefront of motion controls but their technique of appealing to a larger market with affordable technology hardly seems viable given the huge leap their console would have to make in order handle 3D. Sony certainly has the console that can handle 3D, motion controls, and a huge investment in 3D technology but I'm not sure how well they can execute the combination and still create a user friendly experience. Microsoft doesn't seem to have any interest in pushing for 3D/motion controlled games, leaving the impression that they will quietly sit in the back and let someone else take the financial risk of investing in new technologies. Sony seems to be the company to watch for the next big leap in video game tech in the next ten years but, just as with motion controls, Nintendo can't be counted out and must also be closely watched.